Shanti Grumbine is a Brooklyn-based visual artist. She has been an artist in residence at the Millay Colony, Ucross, Yaddo, Vermont Studio Center, Wave Hill Winter Workspace Residency, Lower East Side Printshop Keyholder Residency, Artist in the Marketplace (AIM), Women’s Studio Workshop and the Bemis Center for Contemporary Art. Fellowships include the A.I.R Gallery Fellowship and the LABA Fellowship at the 14th Street Y. In 2016, she was awarded an individual artist grant through the Santo Foundation, a summer residency at the Saltonstall Foundation and a year-long artist residency through the RAIR Fellowship program in Roswell, NM starting this fall. Select exhibition venues include The Bronx Museum, CCA Sante Fe, A.I.R. Gallery, Magnan-Metz Gallery, Planthouse Gallery, and IPCNY. She received an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and a BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

View more of Shanti’s work here: shantigrumbine.com

For the past few years, I have used The New York Times newspaper and its blue delivery wrapping as a vehicle for examining the media’s global influence and how it shapes and maintains our collective and individual belief systems. A long-term struggle with illness sensitized me to the tension between the presentation of unbiased facts and personal experience. For me, The New York Times has become a referent for “objective truth” and a source material for my collages, printmaking, and sculpture.

By cutting, removing, and recombining the text and images from journalistic sections and advertisements, I make space for what has been relegated to the margins, censored and lost in the translation of experience into language. Through this process, new images and patterns emerge as the formal conventions of mass media collide with the metaphysical aspects of knowing and believing: hands-on craft, repetition, and ritual. Referencing the aesthetics of illuminated manuscripts, commemorative paper cutting, and corrupted digital files, I address how media simultaneously informs and obscures our understanding of current events.